Only 22% of top PR pros are actively using Twitter


This is an article by David Clare.
You could write for Behind the Spin too. Find out how here.

Emily Cagle and I (David Clare) recently brought traditional and new media together, with surprising consequences.
Arriving on our desks last month, the PRWeek Power Book 2010 presented a clear opportunity to help create new relationships between key figures in the industry. Taking this who’s who of “the most influential people in PR”, we scoured Twitter for the account names of all those listed.
The list, which can now be found on TweepML (http://tweepml.org/PRWeek-Power-Book-2010/), has so far created over 18,000 new Twitter connections and currently includes 112 Twitter accounts of PR pros – around 22% of all those listed in the original Power Book.
While this has indeed proved a useful and popular resource, several PR pros tweeted asking why such a large proportion (almost 80%) of PR’s biggest influencers aren’t prominently active on what many in the industry consider to be the medium of the moment.
So what do you think? Is Twitter really such a vital communications resource that everybody who is anybody should be on it, or is it more the case that the industry’s top professionals simply don’t need the medium to maintain their influence?
For PRs, is Twitter a vital industry tool, an optional extra, or a playground for the industry’s great and good?
We’d love to hear your views.

Emily Cagle and I have just completed a small research project amongst top PR practitioners which had surprising results.

The new PRWeek Power Book 2010, distributed last month, was our starting point. Taking this ‘who’s who’ of “the most influential people in PR”, we scoured Twitter for the account names of all those listed, to create a Twitter list to make it easy to follow these leaders.

TweepMLThe list, which can now be found here on TweepML, has so far created over 18,000 new Twitter connections and currently includes 112 Twitter accounts of PR pros – around 22% of all those in the Power Book  list.

While this has indeed proved a useful and popular resource, several PR pros tweeted asking why such a large proportion (almost 80%) of PR’s leading influencers aren’t prominently active on what many in the industry consider to be the medium of the moment.

So what do you think?

Is Twitter really such a vital communications resource that everybody who is anybody should be on it, or is it more the case that the industry’s top professionals simply don’t need the medium to maintain their influence?

For PRs, is Twitter a vital industry tool, an optional extra, or a playground for the industry’s great and good?

We’d love to hear your views.

Comments

  1. Very interesting point. I don’t think it is critical for every PR Practitioner to be using Twitter. After all, it is quite a difficult network to maintain if it is to be used frequently and effectively. Not everybody is cut for it.

    I believe that Twitter is a vital tool for the internet but not for every practitioner. Not everybody needs to be social media savvy.

  2. I’m not allowed to use it for work.

    I have a personal account but don’t use it any more as it wasn’t providing me with anything I didn’t already get from news sites, blogs and Facebook.

  3. Derek Hodge says:

    The idea that The new PRWeek Power Book 2010 lists “Top PR pros” is more than a bit debatable.

    neville Hobson has an interesting blog post discussing this http://www.nevillehobson.com/2010/03/28/pr-week-powerbook-genuine-influence-or-simply-a-popularity-list/

    The list seems to come from the top of the PR Week editorial team’s heads.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Firstly, it is a growing sector. Not only are there social media agencies popping up all over the UK, traditional PR companies are making sure they are not left out in the cold by setting up digital practices in-house. All of which creates new jobs, with the expectation of knowledge of social networking – something a University student is more likely to have than your average seasoned PR professional. […]

  2. […] us anymore. Interesting note, even PRWeek analyzed their so-called Power List and noticed that only 22% of them are actually active on Twitter.  Not so much a “power list” then is it? It’s the Gen X in me, but just because you’re […]

  3. […] You can read more about David’s Twitter project by clicking here. […]

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